Water Resources Engineering

Overview

ADA’s extensive watershed and stormwater management expertise covers the full spectrum of projects including planning, assessment, design, permitting, and program management. Our staff’s diversity provides our clients with the flexibility to develop, prioritize, and implement capital improvement programs to address their needs.

Services

  • Watershed Studies
  • Stormwater Management Master Plan Development
  • Low Impact Development Master Plan Development
  • Green Infrastructure Analysis and Design
  • Sea Level Rise Studies
  • Drainage Master Plan/Feasibility Studies
  • Drainage System Analysis and Design
  • Flood Plain Studies & Mapping
  • Hydraulic, Hydrologic & Water Quality Modeling
  • NPDES Permitting
  • Environmental Resources Permitting
  • Regional Stormwater Facility Design
  • Soil Erosion and Sediment Control
  • Canal Dredging
  • Stormwater Utility Development- Implementation
  • Canal Embankment Stabilization
  • Irrigation Supply Planning

Software

  • ICPR V3 and V4
  • XP-SWMM
  • EPA-SWMM
  • MIKE-SHE/MIKE-11/ECOLAB
  • MIKE 21/22
  • HEC-HMS
  • HEC-RAS
  • MODFLOW
  • Flow Master
  • ASAD
  • RMA2 and RMA4
  • ArcGIS
  • WaterCAD
  • Culvert Master
  • WAM
  • QUAL2E

Projects

MORRIS BRIDGE SINK ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING. SOUTHWEST FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT (SWFWMD).

During the dry season, water levels in the Lower Hillsborough River have been dropping low enough to significantly increase salinity levels resulting in negative impacts on estuarine conditions, and ongoing public concern. In the past, Morris Bridge Sink has been used as an emergency water supply source and has now been identified as a key component of Southwest Florida’s plan for greater augmentation and recovery efforts. ADA has been tasked with establishing baseline conditions and continued monitoring of water levels, wetland vegetation and bathymetry, soil subsidence, and biological parameters in and around Morris Bridge Sink. Evaluating the potential impacts of pumping on wetlands near the sink is a key component of the consumptive use permit. Quarterly reports are submitted to the District and a report is presented to DEP annually.


LEHIGH ACRES-MUNICIPAL SERVICES IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT WATERSHED MODEL UPGRADE. LEHIGH ACRES MUNICIPAL SERVICES IMPROVEMENT (LA-MSID).

ADA developed an integrated surface water and groundwater model of the Lehigh Acres Municipal Services Improvement District (LA-MSID, formerly ECWCD) and surrounding areas of Lee County. As part of model calibration, gage data was evaluated for data inconsistencies and reported to LA-MSID. The model was used to evaluate various water resources improvement projects to reduce flooding risk, identify surface water storage opportunities in the basin that would attenuate freshwater runoff to estuaries, maximize groundwater recharge, and restore natural flow in wetlands areas. Two projects that utilized the upgraded model were the GS-10 Preliminary Engineering Analysis for Water Storage Area and Greenbriar Preserve Rehydration and the Hydrologic and Hydraulic Modeling for SR 82 Expansion.

 

GS-10 PRELIMINARY ENGINEERING ANALYSIS FOR WATER STORAGE AREA AND GREENBRIAR PRESERVE REHYDRATION.

 

ADA re-calibrated the MIKE SHE/MIKE 11 model of LA-MSID with focus on updating structure changes and the hydrogeological data with new information found in the Section 10 (GS-10) area. The goal was to develop the best possible operation for using GS-10 as a dry season water storage area and means of 1) increasing hydroperiods in Greenbriar Preserve and 2) reducing peak flows to the Caloosahatchee River. Several scenarios were developed and analyzed using the 2-year simulations to determine the best operation.

 

 

HYDROLOGIC AND HYDRAULIC MODELING FOR SR 82.

 

ADA assisted LA-MSID in evaluating whether their canals could accept FDOT (District 1) runoff without flood attenuation within the road right-of-way. This project utilized the existing LA-MSID Watershed Model; updating the model where possible and improving calibration. Design storms were run with the additional runoff from SR-82 as determined from external ICPR model runoff results. ADA provided extensive planning-level recommendations for managing the additional flows from SR-82. The recommendations help FDOT District 1 save money, which can then be provided to LA-MSID to fund their canal improvement projects


CITY OF CAPE CORAL STORMWATER MASTER PLAN – PHASE II. CITY OF CAPE CORAL.

ADA developed a stormwater master plan for the City of Cape Coral. The work involved extensive updates and recalibration of an existing integrated groundwater/surface water model that was originally developed for the expansion of I-75 in northwest Lee County. Additional canals, new surveyed cross-sections, water control structures, irrigation, and pumping operations within the City were added to the model. As part of model development, extensive research on the City’s canal system was conducted, creating advanced working knowledge of the City of Cape Coral’s water control system.

 

The model was run for dry season and wet season conditions so that the impact of antecedent conditions can be evaluated for various design storms. Design storm simulations (2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, and 100-year events) were conducted to determine the level-of-service challenges associated with canal water control structure operations. Extent of road-flooding for each design storm was quantified using GIS tools. The miles of flooded roads within each Cape Coral drainage basin was used to prioritize the level of flooding within the basins. The project evaluated a range of flood control and water quality treatment alternatives, and ADA provided recommendations for gate operations, weirs, and culverts.


CITY OF CAPE CORAL BASIN STORAGE. CAPE CORAL.

After the successful development of the City of Cape Coral Stormwater Model, the model was updated and re-calibrated with focus on dry season water levels and flows in the City for the purposes of watershed planning for irrigation supply. This model was coined the Charlotte Harbor – North Caloosahatchee River Basin, or CH-NCRB model. Several key projects have utilized the CH-NCRB model, including the Midsummer Canal (Weir 29) Structural Improvement Assessment and the Hydraulic Modeling in Support of ERP Application for Weir 29 Improvements, as well as the Basis of Design Report for the Southwest Aggregates Reservoir and the Cape Coral Basin Storage Study for the Utilities Extension Projects: North 1 and North 2 Areas.

 

HYDRAULIC MODELING IN SUPPORT OF ERP APPLICATION FOR WEIR 29 IMPROVEMENTS

 

ADA updated the existing CH-NCRB model with detailed information in order to better represent structures and channel dimensions in the Yellow Fever Creek watershed and its contributing basins. The updated model was calibrated, design storms were simulated, and areas of flooding were identified. The model results were processed to determine the optimal design for the proposed Structure 29. In addition, design discharges were determined for the proposed Weir 29 and any impacts to the receiving Yellow Fever Creek were evaluated. It was determined that the reduction of dry season flows caused by the improvements to Weir 29 will be mitigated by the implementation of a basin interconnect pump currently under design from Lee County.

 

BASIS OF DESIGN REPORT FOR THE SOUTHWEST AGGREGATES RESERVOIR.

 

The Southwest Aggregates mine site has been evaluated as a potential off-line storage reservoir or flow equalization basin, collecting wet season runoff from Cecil Webb and releasing it to Yucca Pens and the City of Cape Coral during the dry season. This potential storage reservoir would provide additional storage for the excess water currently being detained on the southwest portion of Cecil Webb WMA. ADA updated the regional CH-NCRB model in three different ways for key project tasks: 1) by implementing the proposed Bond Farm and Southwest Aggregates reservoirs and running an initial seepage assessment, 2) by increasing the model simulation period to include 2007 to 2015 a long-term assessment of impacts and water supply was made, and 3) by cutting the model down to a smaller domain centered on the SW Aggregates site and increasing the model resolution, a more focused understanding of the nearby impacts of the reservoir was evaluated. ADA documented the modeling processes that were used to determine the impacts of the proposed Southwest Aggregates Reservoir in terms of available storage, yield, seepage impacts, and groundwater and surface water impacts.

 

CAPE CORAL BASIN STORAGE STUDY FOR THE UTILITIES EXTENSION PROJECTS: NORTH 1 AND NORTH 2 AREAS

 

The City of Cape Coral Utilities Expansion Project (UEP) currently supplies over 43,500 ERUs within 50 square miles of the City. The North 1 and North 2 expansions will add over 17,000 ERU’s, increasing the required irrigation supply from the City. ADA evaluated how the North 2 and North 1 expansions will impact water levels in the supply basins and determined the optimal pumping and gate operations required for supplying existing reuse pumps and supplying irrigation water to new users, all while maintaining minimum levels in the City canals. This optimization of the transfer pumps involved complex operations at key locations. In addition, proposed modifications to existing weirs were implemented in a phased approach to determine the structure modifications that were most important for storing dry season water. This analysis will be crucial to the City as new irrigation supply pumps go on-line and further structure changes are planned.


STA-1W EXPANSION PROJECT WATERSHED HYDRAULIC STUDY. SOUTH FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT (SFWMD).

In 2012, the State of Florida and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in accordance with the implementation of several projects to expand water quality improvement, initiated this study regarding the expansion of the existing Stormwater Treatment Area (STA-1W) facility by 6,500 acres. The expanded STA is intended to work in conjunction with a Flow Equalization Basin (FEB) in the S 5A Basin with approximately 45,000 acre-feet (ac-ft) of storage. In order to determine the most optimal and cost effective configuration of the STA expansion, ADA prepared a study of various alternatives for configuring the expansion areas and provided a detailed evaluation of the three top performing configurations. The initial tasks of the study included reviewing available data, selecting an analysis tool for one- and two-dimensional modeling of the STA (MIKE-11 and MIKE-FLOOD), defining the performance evaluation criteria for alternative configurations, and preparing a calibrated and validated model of the existing STA 1W facility.

 

For the second phase of the project, ADA analyzed a suite of twelve (12) configuration alternatives for the expansion area within the one-dimensional (1D) model for three different hydrologic conditions: high, normal and low inflow. The top four configurations were then evaluated using the 1D model for a long-term simulation from 1965 through 2005. Once the results of the long term simulation were evaluated, the top three configurations were evaluated using the 2D model for three different hydrologic conditions: high, normal and low inflow. ADA’s final recommendation included conceptual plans and a planning-level cost estimate for each of the three (3) optimal STA-1W Expansion configurations with respect to treatment efficiency and cost effectiveness. The planning-level design plans included conceptual design of inflow and outflow canals, containment and interior levels, and inflow and outfall control structures. Cost estimates were prepared in accordance with the District DCM 7 – Procedure for Development of Opinion of Probable Construction Costs.


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